Staithes

Martham (Ferrygate) Boat Dyke – 2012

The word staithe appears to be unique to Norfolk. It comes from the Old Norse word Stoth  meaning  “landing stage” for unloading boats.

Martham has three staithes which cannot be identified on Fadens Map of 1797 so it seems they were constructed after that time.

The earliest record for them is their appearance in the 1812 Inclosure Award for Martham. They are described as:

  • Parcel number 6 which we now know as Martham Boat Dyke.
  • Parcel number 10 which is at the north end of Cess Road.
  • Parcel number 12 which is near Dungeon Corner north of Damgate.

Martham Boat Dyke

The Boat Dyke was described as Parcel No 6 in the 1812 Inclosure Award and as being “for the conveyance of corn, manure and other goods to and from the river by owners and occupiers of the Parish.” The actual award allocated a broad strip of land running along its west side to the ‘Special Commissioners for the Public Staithe’.

1812 Inclosure Award map showing the Boat Dyke

1842 Tithe Award map showing the Boat Dyke

The 1842 Tithe Award map, above, shows the staithe as plot number 480 which is described as a boat dyke and staithe which was owned and occupied by the Commissioners of Drainage. The Finance Act map and documents of 1910 also give the Drainage Commissioners as owners.
Generally referred to as Martham Boat Dyke it is managed by the Martham Boat Dyke Trust under the auspices of Martham Parish Council. The Trust gets its income from letting out the mooring rights and its object is the maintenance of the staithe and to give charitable grants for the benefit of the inhabitants of the Parish.

Cess Staithe

Cess Staithe was described as Parcel 10 in the 1812 Inclosure Award and as a small plot of land surrounding a short inlet from the River Thurne. It was allotted to the Special Commissioners for Public Staithes and approached by a private road No14  which was also allotted to them. The award explicitly made clear it was “for the use and convenience of the owners and occupiers of estates within the said parish of Martham for the time being for the laying and depositing theron of the corn manure and other things which shall be conveyed or shall be intended to be conveyed by the said river or to and from the said river by means of the said boat dyke”.

1812 Inclosure Award showing Cess Staithe
1842 Tithe Award showing Cess Staithe

On the 1842 Tithe Award map, above, the Staithe is shown as two separate plots of land Nos 540 & 483, both owned and occupied by the Drainage Commissioners. Plot 540 was described as a boat house, whilst 483 as ‘mill and yards’, a drainage windmill having been erected there. The 1910 Finance Act maps and documents likewise give the Drainage Commissioners as owners.
Cess Staithe was the subject of an adverse possession case in 2014, which was won by the occupiers, the Martham Boat Building and Development Company Ltd, which had been using and developing the area since the 1940s. The evidence suggested that Cess Staithe should belong to the Environment Agency, having presumably passed in the 1930s from the Drainage Commissioners to the East Norfolk Rivers Catchment Board and then in 1948 to the East Suffolk and Norfolk Rivers Board and in 1966 passed via the Anglian Water Authority and the National Rivers Authority to the Environment Agency. None of the Agencies were deemed to have maintained the staithe and the Tribunal Inspector confirmed its possession was now in the hands of the Boat Building and Development Company. It has effectively become a  lapsed parish staithe. 

Damgate Staithe

Damgate Staithe is owned by Martham Boat Dyke Trust and the title is registered at the Land Registry.

The Staithe is described as Parcel number 12 in the 1812 Inclosure Award and as a small inlet from the river, at TG 45270 20320. It is described as a public staithe for the use of owners and occupiers of land in Martham and was allotted to the ‘Special Commissioners for the Public Staithe’.

1812 Inclosure Award map showing Damgate Staithe
1842 Tithe Award map showing Damgate Staithe

On the 1842 Tithe Award map it is shown as plot 467 approached by a private road number 466. Both were owned and occupied by the Drainage Commissioners. The staithe is now silted up but the frontage is used for mooring. It looks as if it should be accessible from the end of Damgate via the road numbered as 466 but the ‘road’ could only have ever been a rough track which has since disappeared in the plough soil. Intrepid explorers may be able to reach the staithe using this route but it is not a definitive footpath. Easier access is via Ferrygate Boat Dyke, the riverbank and definitive footpath No2.

You may also like to read the following complimentary pages: Heigham Holmes, Martham Ferry, River Thurne & Martham Broad.

My thanks to the Broads Authority for some of the information supplied above.

Photographs

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