Chronology

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Date Event
Prehistoric to Iron Age Martham, the Isle of Flegg and even Britain, of course, did not exist at this time as a separate land mass but some prehistoric objects have been found in and around what is now Martham.  Intrigued?  For more information click Prehistoric
2.6m to 10,000BC Palaeolithic period. For more information click Prehistoric
10,000 to 4,000BC Mesolithic period. For more information click Prehistoric
4,000 to 2,500BC Neolithic period. For more information click Prehistoric
2,500 to 800BC Bronze Age. For more information click Bronze Age
800BC to 61AD Iron Age. For more information click Iron Age. Also, Celtic Britain 600BC to c50AD
43AD to 410AD In 43 AD the Romans landed and began the conquest of Britain. By 300 to 400 Britain was largely self-sufficient Romano-British country. There was a sparse Romano-British occupation to the north side of Martham by settlers who were probably farmers. For more details go to Romans. In the year 410 Emperor Honorius refused to help Britain against attacking Anglo Saxons.
400 to 600 The Dark Ages.
410 to 599 Anglo Saxon England. Martham gained its named after the polecats or “martens” that were common to the area and “ham” having the Angle origin of a residence of a thane or lord. For more information go to Anglo Saxons.
599 to 624 King Raedwald was the most powerful Anglo Saxon King of East Anglia.
650 to 830 There were seven Saxon Kingdoms including East Anglia. Viking raids began in 781, almost certainly utilising the River Bure and Breydon Estuary to settle on the south side of the Isle of Flegg at Runham and at Martham on the north side.
1066 Battle of Hastings. Harold became King.
1086 Domesday Book commissioned. Martham was well populated and widely cultivated. The population had a greater than average number of free farmers. For more information click Domesday.
1101 Bishop Herbert gave Martham to his new Priory of Norwich resulting in the first Martham Manor. For more information click Anglo-Danish.
1215 The Magna Carta.
1292 A survey by the Cathedral Priory Manor of Martham called the Stowe Survey was carried out recording 376 tenants of land in Martham which included 75 families holding land as tenants of the Manor.
1294 A very poor harvest was recorded in the village. Farmland was valued at 3/- (15p) per acre which was considered to be high. For more information click Anglo-Danish.
1315 & 1316 Martham had two wet seasons, poor harvests and high corn prices. For more information click Medieval.
1325 There was a great drought that made it difficult to find pasture for animals.
1332 Tax records show a population of around 1,000 to 1,500 people in the village. For more information click Medieval.
1349/50   The Black Death spread up the river Bure to Martham. The mortality rate was at least 55% of villagers. In 1350 only 368 out of a possible 617 people attended harvest duties the rest were presumed sick or dead. For more information click Black Death.
1370 to 1380 Following the Black Death many men started to leave Martham and look for work in Yarmouth if only for the fishing season.
1381 The Peasants Revolt in Norfolk. Martham had minor involvement. For more information click Peasants.
1400 Local farm labourers earned about 11s  7d a year (58p) which rose to about £1 in 1424. For more information click Medieval.
1404 There was a fishery at a place called Cobham College Manor on the river Thurne near the present floating pontoon at Ferrygate Lane which was later let for £5  6s  8d a year. For more information click Medieval.
1416 to 1435 A Martham man bought a cottage and nine acres of land in the village for 50s (£2.50) in 1416 and had amassed 30 acres at his death in 1435.
1480 Martham’s annual fair started according to the Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England & Wales dated 1516.
1534 to 1549 The Reformation period. In 1549 the first Church of England Prayer Book was authorised.
1649 Charles I was executed and the ‘Commonwealth’ established.
1660 Monarchy restored. 
1665 Plague of London.
1720’s to 1840s Industrial revolution.
1739 to 1785 The lives of the poor in Martham at this time are explained more if you click on Poor.   
1800 The first Baptist Church was built in Martham next to what is now Oak Tree Close. It was demolished by 1878 but the graveyard still exists there. For more information click on Baptists.
1802 The West Flegg Electoral Roll (Poll Book) of people entitled to vote on behalf of Martham can be seen by clicking 1802 Poll Book. 
1812 Martham Inclosure Award. For more information click on Inclosure.
1832 The West Flegg Electoral Roll of people entitled to vote on behalf of Martham can be seen by clicking 1832 Register. 
1835 The West Flegg Electoral Roll of people entitled to vote on behalf of Martham can be seen by clicking 1835 Register. 
1836 The West Flegg Electoral Roll of people entitled to vote on behalf of Martham can be seen by clicking 1836 Register. 
1837 The West Flegg Electoral Roll of people entitled to vote on behalf of Martham can be seen by clicking 1837 Register. 
1840 The West Flegg Electoral Roll of people entitled to vote on behalf of Martham can be seen by clicking 1840 Register. 
1841 The West Flegg Electoral Roll of people entitled to vote on behalf of Martham can be seen by clicking 1841 Register. 
1841 The 1841 census was carried out based on where people lived at midnight on 6th June. You can see an alphabetical list of people living in Martham at that time by clicking 1841
1842 The Martham Tithe Award.
1844 The West Flegg Electoral Roll of people entitled to vote on behalf of Martham can be seen by clicking 1844 Register. 
1845 The West Flegg Electoral Roll of people entitled to vote on behalf of Martham can be seen by clicking 1845 Register. 
1845 A copy of White’s Directory can be seen by clicking Whites 1845.
1850 A copy of Hunt & Co Directory can be seen by clicking Hunt 1850.
1851 The 1851 census was carried out based on where people lived on 30th March 1851.
1855 The West Flegg Electoral Roll of people entitled to vote on behalf of Martham can be seen by clicking 1855 Register. 
1861 The 1861 census was carried out based on where people lived on 7th April 1861.
1865 The West Flegg Electoral Roll of people entitled to vote on behalf of Martham can be seen by clicking 1865 Register. 
1871 The 1871 census was carried out based on where people lived on 2nd April 1871.
1877 Martham railway station opened on 15th July. For more information click railway.
1879 The present Baptist Church on the north side of the Green was built.
1880 Martham Methodist Church was built in Repps Road.
1881 The 1881 census was carried out based on where people lived on 3rd April 1881.
1883 A copy of Kelly’s Trade Directory can be seen by clicking Kelly’s 1883.
1891 The 1891 census was carried out based on where people lived on 5th April 1891.
1894/95 Click on Gazetteer to see how the Gazetteer of England and Wales described Martham at this time.
1896 A copy of Kelly’s Trade Directory can be seen by clicking Kelly’s 1896.
1901 The 1901 census was carried out based on where people lived on 31st March 1901.
1911 The 1911 census was carried out based on where people lived on 2nd April 1911.
1914 to 1918 The First World War. For photos of the war memorial click War Memorial. This page also gives details of Martham people who gave their lives during both World Wars.
1937 A copy of Kelly’s Trade Directory can be seen by clicking Kelly’s 1937.
1939 A pre-war register was compiled of the population in preparation for rationing and war needs. Click 1939 Register for a list of those living in Martham at the time and copies of the actual Register Returns.
1939 to 1945 The Second World War. For details of Martham people who gave their lives during both World Wars click on War Memorial.
1959 The last train went through Martham railway station on 28th February before it closed. The former Butagas depot at the station closed in the same year. For more details click railway.